7 Summer Reads for Elementary, Middle, and High School

One of the best parts about summer is the freedom to read what you want instead of what’s assigned in class. Take a look at these suggestions that will entice readers across grade levels to pick up a book while enjoying their summer break.

 

K–5 Readers

  1. Going on a zoo trip? We’ve got the perfect companion book! Opuestos en el reino animal is packed full of fun animal facts kids can enjoy before or after an outing to the zoo this summer.

 

  1. Father’s Day is June 19! Commemorate this special day by reading El mejor es mi papa by one of Puerto Rico’s best-selling authors. This book joyfully celebrates the father-child relationship with a comical contest to see who is the best dad of all!

 

  1. Take a scary summer storm and turn it into a learning opportunity with the book Después de la tormenta from award-winning author Alma Flor Ada. Charming illustrations accompany this engaging story of a seed who, in the aftermath of a storm, goes on a journey to teach kids how seeds become flowers.

 

Middle Grades

  1. Siblings inevitably must spend more time together in close quarters during the summer months. Judy Blume’s Fudge books take a comical yet tender look at the relationship between brothers. In Doble Fudge, the younger Fudge annoys his older brother Peter with his new obsession over money.

 

  1. Readers can let their imagination run wild under the summer moon with the fantasy novel La niña que bebió la luna. This Newberry Medalist explores the themes of truth, justice, and growing up through an enchanting tale of a young girl raised by a witch, a swamp monster, and an impossibly tiny dragon.

 

Young Adults

  1. Action abounds after a group of teens begins receiving strange text messages and emails in Ana Maria Machado’s Mensaje para ti. The perfect detective story for a summer adventure, this science fiction novel uses time travel and history to reflect on the importance of memories.

 

  1. Life is overwhelming at times, but reading about the problems of a fictional character can be a catharsis. In Todas las palabras son tuyas, an eighteen-year-old girl, just graduated from high school, must face the death of her father and deal with her new reality. Sick of feeling sad, she decides to go to New York City, which was her father’s favorite place. While this novel deals with heavy topics such as love and loss, young adults will relate to the protagonist and her quest for healing.

 

By Kelli Drummer-Avendano

Also read: 4 End-of-Year Traditions for New Teachers

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