Featured Readings

5 “Firsts” to Celebrate During Black History Month

By- Kelli Drummer-Avendano

February officially became the month to celebrate Black History in 1976. Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln both have birthdays in February, which is the reason this month was chosen. However, the very first time African American history was officially honored was in 1926, during what was called “Negro History Week.” Here are five other important “firsts” in Black History you should know about.

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Featured Readings

Resources for your Spanish Classroom: The History Behind Black History Month

Angela PadronBy Angela Padron

Black History Month is one of the most important celebrations in our country. It recognizes the achievements of many African-Americans throughout our nation’s history. Black History Month began in 1915 by Carter G. Woodson, a Harvard historian, and Jesse E. Moorland who was a prominent minister. They founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (ASNLH), today known as the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH). This organization was dedicated to researching and promoting the accomplishments of black Americans and people of African descent. 

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Classroom Activities

Meaningful Projects to Commemorate Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

By- Kelli Drummer-Avendano

Martin Luther King Jr. Day was first observed in 1986. Since then, it’s become a holiday synonymous with service and equality. While most students have heard of Dr. King or have a vague idea about why he’s important, teachers can make the commemoration of this day more significant by incorporating activities that speak to his work and lasting legacy. Here are a few ideas to get started.

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Featured Readings

Celebrating Black History Month in the Spanish Classroom

Angela PadronBy Angela Padron

Black History Month is one of the most important topics to teach in classrooms. For several Hispanic countries, this celebration is also relevant. Many Latino countries’ populations have African origins as well. Slaves began to be brought from Africa to the New World by early Spanish and Portuguese explorers, including Christopher Columbus. In fact, Brazil now has the largest population of African people outside of the continent of Africa. So not only can students in Spanish classrooms learn about prominent African Americans, but they can also learn about people of African decent from their own countries.

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